Should you show your prices on your website?

For service-based businesses, the debate surrounding whether or not you should list your prices on your website is an intense one. But the answer to this question is not black and white. There are gray areas that will affect your decision, such as: your current situation, your industry, your packages, your values, how compelling your sales copy is, your sales call closing rate, and more. Today’s blog post covers the factors you should consider and which option will be the best for your business.


Client preferences.


First things first, listing your prices on your website should be a decision based around your customer’s needs, not your own. Ask yourself: what is my client’s budget range? Are these flexible or non-negotiable? How tight is my client’s deadline to start the project? Do they have time for a discovery call or do they need quick info so they can book fast?


If you don’t display prices, how would your clients react?


  • Would they automatically assume the price is out of their budget?

  • Would a discovery call feel like too much of a barrier for them?


If you display your prices, how would your clients react?


  • Would there be a higher rate of potential clients booking sales calls with you because your pricing matches their budget?

  • Would displaying your prices weed out unqualified leads?


By going through these questions from your client’s point of view, it should help you gain clarity in which direction you should take.


Your pricing structure.


Ask yourself: “Are your offers well-defined? Is your service standardized?” For example, a service that isn’t standardized would look like a custom web design service that warrants a personalized quote for each client (since the scope varies based on the client’s needs). In this instance, it’s best to avoid posting a standard rate since it’s different for every client. If you want to include some sort of pricing, however, you can show a minimum price, such as “Starting at $3,000”, to disqualify anyone who does not have the minimum budget to work with you.